Archive for June 2017

Dental Implants Types

What are dental implants?

Dental implants are artificial replacements for dental roots. Dental implant is usually manufactured from titanium or titanium alloys. The dental implant surface can be covered with different substances to increase its stability and osseointegration. There are several dental implants types, but the contemporary ones have tronconic or cylindrical shapes, the same as the natural dental root. Crowns or dental works (bridges, prosthesis, etc.) are fixed on the dental implants. Dental works on implants can be fixed or detachable (mobile).

Types of dental implants

Types of dental implants - Root shape

Root shape

Root shape dental implants are one of the most popular in the world. They may have cylindrical shapes, smooth or with spires and conical

Dental implant surface

Modern implants have the bone contact surface in rugose topography to allow bone cells to settle on and osseointegrate it, and the one in contact with gums has a smooth, shiny topography, for epithelial gum cells to adhere, sealing the space surrounding the implant’s neck. Technology has enabled the creation of rugose surfaces in several topographies (nano and micro rugosity), so that bone cells can perfectly adhere to the implant. The more rugose surface and carefully processed, the higher the dental implant quality. That because bone adheres much better and more uniform, and present rugosities increase the contact surface between implant and bone, increasing its mechanical stability initially and biological subsequently to osseointegration.

Dental implant surface

Dental implant components and types of work on implant

Dental implant treatment involves several components: implant itself, prosthetic abutment (connecting implant with the work) and dental crown.

Dental implant components

Cemented dental works on implant

Cemented dental works on implant

Dental implant defines not only the root area (replacement). One of the means through which a crown is attached to the dental implant is by cementing it on an intermediary piece (prosthetic abutment). The prosthetic abutment is screwed to the implant and the work is fixed on it using an adhesive (dental cement). It represents the perfect way to place the crown for a single dental implant and requires great caution because, during the moment of sticking, cement remains/excess can infiltrate under the gum, damaging the implant in time. Sometimes the crown can be cleaned with difficulty and can lose cement or can be lost / broken.

Dental works screwed on implant

Dental works screwed on implant

The second method for attaching a crown/dental work to the implant is by screwing it. Therefore, crown is directly screwed to the implant and the fixing screw access hole is covered with obturation material (filling) matching the tooth color. The advantage lies in its easy removal anytime when needed (professional hygiene, small fixes, etc.). The disadvantage lies in the fact that this tiny screw can weaken under high pressure, requiring periodic tightening with special keys, wrenches (with a precisely calibrated force couple).

Dental mini-implants

Dental mini-implants

Dental mini-implants are extremely thin implants, with limited resistance and with limited directions:

  • Narrow spaces (lateral incisors area) are the narrowest teeth inside the oral cavity – not recommended for the rest of the teeth (they can fracture),
  • Mobile dentures stabilization (mobile dentures on „over denture” implants) for the elderly, when mastication forces aren’t that high,
  • As temporary implants, for fixing temporary works until definitive implant integration or until bone addition healing when lost bone volume is restored through resorption (melting).

Dental mini-implants

Implants which are no longer used (history)

“Blade” type implants

“Blade” type implants

Subperiostal implants

Subperiostal implants

Bar fixed to the bone

Bar fixed to the bone

Transosseus implants

Transosseus implants

Although they were “sensational” in their time, these dental implants types are no longer used (blade, subperiostal) or, some of them, are used limited: “bar fixed to the bone” implants and “transosseus” ones – in case of severe bone atrophy, when patient cannot undergo bone addition.

Zygomatic implants

Represented by extremely long implants used in special situations.

Zygomatic implants

Zygomatic implants are placed in the back of the maxillary bone (superior), where maxillary sinuses reside and bone has the lowest density. The tips of these implants are anchored into the zygomatic bones (cheekbones), which maintain volume and density throughout time, even if the maxillary bone is resorbed. These implants are recommended for severe maxillary atrophies, when there is practically no bone left (in the superior maxillary) or remaining bone is in an extremely low quantity, being filled with air by exaggerated sinus volume enlargement. In this case it represents a good alternative to invasive surgery, when patient is unable or unwilling to undertake complex bone additions for lost bone volume enlargement in this region. Zygomatic implants rapidly and efficiently ensure an excellent stability in the posterior area for immediate dental works (allows immediate anchoring to fixed works).

In certain techniques, conventional implants can be successfully combined – in the frontal region we insert conventional implants and in the posterior areas we insert zygomatic implants – procedure called „TotalFix+”.

Zygomatic dental implants types

For severe maxillary atrophy conditions in all areas (including anterior) a number of two or three zygomatic implants are inserted individually yet simultaneously, in the same session, on each side of the superior maxillary (four or six in total), techniques called „QuadZygoma” respectively „Sixzygoma”.

Zygomatic dental implants types

Zygomatic implant insertion is carried out through extremely complex surgical procedures that involve an experienced medical team (implantologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, prosthetists, anesthetist, etc.) and all equipment specific for a major surgical act – operating block, general anesthesia, dental CT scanner, etc.

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Inman Aligner vs. Invisalign: Why We Prefer the Inman Aligner

When it comes to straightening your teeth without the use of traditional metal braces, there are few options to choose from. However, two of the most common options adults choose to straighten their teeth are Invisalign clear braces and Inman Aligner.

In this article, we are going to compare Invisalign with Inman Aligner so you can see which one is right for you.

Note: The prime use of the Inman Aligner is for people who didn’t wear their retainer after braces and the front teeth have crowded again.

These people usually don’t want full braces again, so the Inman Aligner is a nice and simple way to make them happy. Invisalign can also do this, too, but is also used for full orthodontics, which the Inman Aligner can’t do.

So, for the purpose of this article, we are comparing the Inman Aligner with Invisalign based on how they fix the problem of front teeth crowding.

Let’s talk about Invisalign first

Invisalign works by creating a custom series of aligners that are designed to fit your teeth perfectly. Many adults like the idea of Invisalign because it enables him or her to straighten crooked teeth without the social stigma of being an adult with braces.

So, here are a few of the pros of Invisalign:

  • Clear option for straightening your teeth
  • Can work well for a variety of cases

Now, in addition to the pros of using Invisalign to straighten teeth, there are some cons that you need to consider when trying to determine whether or not Invisalign is the correct treatment option for you.

Here are a few of the cons associated with Invisalign:

  • The aligners must be worn 24/7 except to eat and clean.
  • You must remove aligners to eat or drink anything (except water).
  • It’s important to brush your teeth after every meal to avoid discoloring or staining.
  • New aligners are needed every 2 weeks, with visits to your dentist or orthodontist every 4-6 weeks.
  • Invisalign is generally a more costly procedure when compared to the Inman Aligner.

So what about the Inman Aligner?

Now, let’s move on and discuss the Inman Aligner. Having done both invisalign and the Inman aligner, we find the Inman is more effective for most patients.

The Inman Aligner (as we mentioned at the beginning of the article) fits a certain patient profile, and is very effective at accomplishing the goals patients want to achieve in those situations.

The Inman Aligner and Invisalign really have different target audiences. Invisalign is a system that is designed to be a comprehensive orthodontics solution, and at least in the orthodontist world, most of them charge as much or more for Invisalign than they do for regular braces. Part of the reason for that is because the shells themselves are so expensive.

The ideal patient for Inman Aligner treatment is an adult who had braces when they were kids (or maybe they didn’t), and they quit wearing their retainers and now their bottom teeth or their top teeth have started to shift and crowd again.

While they certainly don’t like the fact that their teeth are crowded, they do not want to do braces again (metal braces carry a social stigma for some, and Invisalign is an expensive procedure).

The Inman Aligner is a much less expensive, much quicker way to straighten those front four teeth and reduce crowding on the upper or lower four teeth. Sometimes at Lifetime Smiles we do go to an Invisalign-like concept and we use a series of clear shells for very minor movement.

So to recap, here are the pros and cons of using the Inman Aligner compared to Invisalign:

Here are a few of the pros of using an Inman Aligner:

  • Easy to remove and clean
  • Less expensive than Invisalign or metal braces
  • Works quickly
  • Only one is needed (aligners do not need to be replaced as treatment progresses)
  • Great solution for crowding of the upper and lower front teeth in adults

While we think the Inman Aligner is a great solution for our patients suffering from front teeth crowding issues, here are a few of the things some people have expressed as cons when wearing the Inman Aligner:

  • The Inman Aligner has a small metal bar, which can be seen
  • It is more bulky than clear shells
  • Only works for crowding of the front teeth
  • You have adjustments every two weeks

So What is the best option for you?

At Lifetime Smiles, we believe in making sure each patient gets the proper treatment that is right for them. Above, we have outlined the pros and cons of both Invisalign and the Inman aligner in order to help you make an educated decision on which one is right for you.

So, if you want to learn more about the Inman Aligner and how our dentist, can help restore your smile, contact us today!

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Inman Aligner – How Does It Straighten the Teeth?

More and more people are getting the Inman Aligner advantage and when it comes to correcting the front teeth, it has become a favorite among a growing number of dentists. What is Inman Aligner and how does it straighten your teeth?

What is the Inman Aligner?

Inman Aligner is a simple, removable appliance that can quickly and safely align and straighten the front 6 upper/lower front teeth. The Inman Aligner is perfect as a standalone treatment or to correct alignment of the teeth prior to other cosmetic procedures like boding or veneers.

How does it work?

The Inman Aligner has one buccal and one lingual bow that “pushes” the teeth into right position with light and steady forces.

Is it comfortable to wear?

For the first 3-4 days you might experience soreness or tenderness in the mouth and/or increased salivation. After this initial period of time, patients say that it becomes more comfortable.

How often should a patient wear it? Does the amount of time it is being worn affects it’s effectively?

You need to wear the Inman Aligners for 16-20 hours/day. General rule of thumb is the more hours the aligners are worn, the faster the treatment and the less hours, the slower the treatment.

How different is the Inman Aligner from the other orthodontic alternatives?

Inman Aligner is a compromised orthodontic treatment since it can only move the front upper and/or lower 6 teeth. But it is faster and cheaper than fixed braces or clear aligners like Invisalign. All treatment with Inman Aligner is evaluated and planned by the computer to know exactly how much space we need to create or close. Every patient is presented with a 3D printed model (after treatment) before the treatment.

 

Who is a candidate for the Inman Aligner?

All patients – no matter the age that present following:

  1. Healthy teeth and gums
  2. Upper/lower front teeth with mild/moderate crowding and differential wear
  3. Relapse from earlier orthodontic treatment due to failed retention
  4. For busy people who cannot wear orthodontic appliance since Inman Aligner can easily be removed for an important meeting/phone call
  5. Preferably do 1 arch at the time and if you only need to treat upper or lower teeth

How long does a general case take?

Most of my cases take between 6-12 weeks.

What can patients expect when they start wearing it?

How fast it works without pain and what a beautiful smile you can create.

What’s involved in the treatment?

After the first assessment to verify if you are suitably for Inman Aligner treatment:

  1. Impressions and photos are taken.
  2. Discussion with the patient which tooth is in most favorably position, etc.
  3. Measure the width of one tooth for calibration.

At the day of fitting the Inman Aligner:

  1. Instructions given how to insert/remove the Inman Aligner
  2. Place the composite “tags” to keep the bow in right place.
  3. If needed create space by “stripping” between the teeth with very thin diamond strips.

How should patients care for the aligners?

Brush with toothbrush and toothpaste and keep it in the yellow container box when not in use.

Do patients need retainers at the end of the treatment? If so, what kind of retainers are they? And how long should they be worn?

You will always need a retainer after all kind of orthodontic treatment as long you want your teeth to stay aligned. For best results and maintenance post-treatment, I prefer a fixed multi-strained retainer glued to the back of your teeth.

How often are the visits to the dentist?

I see my patients for regular check-ups every 2-3 weeks. Once treatment is complete, I see them every six months to make sure the retainer is in perfect condition.

If you wish to book an appointment, please call Dentcare Dental Clinic at Toll Free: 800 80 80 80 or request an appointment online.

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invisalign braces teen

Dental Braces vs Invisalign

Benefits of Invisalign

The use of Invisalign is an efficient method for tooth movements that are not too complicated. A set of clear, computer-generated trays is ideally worn 24 hours a day with change-outs every two weeks. There are certain trays that can last for six months to one year. However, these require some form of retention to prevent the teeth from shifting back. One of its best advantages is that the trays are relatively invisible. Hence the name Invisalign. Some people simply don’t want anyone to know they are wearing braces. They also provide help for people who wish to obtain straight teeth while still feeling comfortable in social situations. Wearing Invisalign offers comfort because it does not affect your speech.

Invisalign treatment can be expected to work more efficiently for esthetic purposes rather than for the purpose of improving the functionality of the teeth. This is why many people, especially those who have complex dental problems, still prefer dental braces.

Benefits of dental braces

Dental braces feature brackets that tend to run along a wire. An orthodontist or other trained dental professional is responsible for affixing the dental braces onto the teeth. The wire and brackets that form part of the braces are pressed against the patient’s teeth. This supports slight movements that can help in properly aligning and straightening the teeth.

Braces vs Invisalign

Braces vs Invisalign

Dental braces can correct even the most complicated issues in aligning the teeth. The braces are not only esthetically pleasing, but functional as well. These are beneficial in closing gaps and correcting crooked teeth.

Dental braces are better for complex cases

There are plenty of reasons why you might choose dental braces over Invisalign. Mainly composed either of colored metal or resin brackets, braces are attached onto the face of the teeth. Braces also come with a wire that runs through them and affixes them in place. One benefit of dental braces over Invisalign is that these are not removable.

Unlike an Invisalign treatment which is extremely useful for esthetic purposes and simple dental issues, braces are functional and work efficiently for fixing complex tooth issues. Braces can also be expected to work faster at closing gaps and aligning the teeth than Invisalign.

According to patients, braces work in moving misaligned teeth within a relatively short period. The use of these dental materials in aligning the teeth is also a huge help in fixing bites and creating an attractive and healthy smile. This plays a significant role in boosting the patient’s self-confidence. Dental braces are also useful in correcting malocclusion (crooked or crowded teeth) and bad bites.

If the patient’s bite is abnormal, then the application of braces can bring out his or her best smile. The immediate correction of this problem can improve the patient’s smile while also boosting his or her oral health. This is beneficial because being unable to correct an abnormal bite, or other dental issues that are treatable using braces, can lead to oral health problems. This proves the usefulness of dental braces in curing various dental problems.

Are braces better than Invisalign? Ultimately it’s going to come down to determining the specific need in each case and deciding which one will meet that need in the best way for your patient.

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How do Porcelain Veneers Differ from Dental Crowns?

Porcelain Veneers

Porcelain Veneers

In comparison to crowns, porcelain veneers just cover over the front side of a tooth.

Porcelain veneers are wafer thin.

As alluded above, crowns and porcelain veneers differ by way of their comparative thickness.

  • Porcelain veneers are wafer thin, typically measuring 1 millimeter in thickness or less.
  • Dental crowns usually have a thickness of 2 millimeters or more.

Less tooth grinding is required.

This means that significantly less tooth trimming is required when veneers are placed.

  • Less reduction is needed on the tooth’s front side, where the veneer is bonded.
  • No trimming is needed on the tooth’s backside.
  • With some veneering techniques no tooth reduction is needed at all.

This is a very important feature of veneers. It means that, as compared to crowns, when they are place less healthy tooth structure is sacrificed. Additionally, the preparation process is less traumatic for the tooth (and possibly the patient too).

Comparing characteristics and applications of crowns vs. veneers.

Crowns and veneers have their own individual set of characteristics that generally make one or the other more suitable for certain applications. Here are some of the factors dentists take into consideration when determining which one makes the better choice for a patient’s case.

Dental Crowns

dental crown

Dental Crowns

  • Can be used to produce a large color change for a tooth.
  • Can create significant shape changes for a tooth.
  • Are often used to rebuild and strengthen teeth that are badly broken or decayed.
  • Crowns are very strong and durable. They make a good choice in those situations where a tooth is exposed to heavy chewing or biting forces, or else forces created by tooth clenching and grinding (bruxism).
  • Placing a crown requires a significant amount of tooth reduction.
  • Once a crown has been placed on a tooth, it will always require one.

As you’ll see in the next list, as compared to crowns which can be used to rebuild and strengthen teeth, porcelain veneers are typically used in applications that are just cosmetic in nature.

Porcelain Veneers

Dental Veneers: Porcelain Veneer installation Procedure. 3D illustration

  • A case that utilizes both porcelain veneers and crowns.
  • Crowns are stronger and used to make larger shape changes.
  • Can be used to produce a color change for a tooth. Slight to moderate changes usually give the most life-like results.
  • Can create minor shape changes for a tooth.
  • Are placed on teeth whose underlying tooth structure is generally healthy and intact.
  • Are strong but brittle. Porcelain veneers typically do best in those situations where the forces placed upon them are relatively light or passive.
  • Require much less tooth trimming than dental crowns. Some veneering situations may require no tooth reduction at all.
  • In some special instances, porcelain veneer placement may be reversible. In most cases, however, once a veneer has been placed, the tooth will always require some type of covering. This might be another porcelain or other type of veneer, or else the tooth could be further reduced and a dental crown placed.

 

Instances when crowns and veneers barely differ at all.

Dental Crown

Dental Crown

There can be times when the distinction between an all-ceramic crown and (what’s referred to as a) veneer can be difficult to make at all.

What we’re referring to here is the growing trend where the treating dentist has elected to aggressively trim a tooth in preparation for its veneer. Cutting more deeply into it, and on more surfaces (sides), than outlined by the original, very conservative, protocol for this procedure.

For the most part, this type of zealous trimming is a symptom of the dentist applying veneering technique to a case for which it is not best suited. This would include using veneers to “straighten” severely misaligned teeth (“instant” orthodontics) or lightening darkly stained ones. (These types of cases are frequently plagued with longevity issues.)

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Perfect Hollywood Smile

9 Tips for a Perfect Hollywood Smile

Many dream of healthy and beautiful teeth, but few people dare to try chemical whitening.

We at DentCare have found several procedures you can perform at home that won’t damage your enamel or do you any harm at all. Of course, these tricks are not a substitute for regular visits to the dentist. But if you follow this advice on a regular basis you’ll see your teeth lighten up a few tones, while your gums will become healthier.

DIY whitening toothpaste

Mix 1 teaspoon of turmeric with the same amount of clear coconut oil and 2-3 drops of mint oil. Use this mix as you would regular toothpaste — it will take care of your enamel, whiten your teeth, and freshen your breath.

Tea tree oil

If you dilute 5 drops of 100% tea tree oil in half a glass of water and rinse your mouth with it every day after brushing your teeth, you’ll see the results in just a couple of weeks. To make the effect even more striking, clean your teeth additionally with a drop of oil once or twice a week, though not more often.

Strawberry paste

Take a fresh strawberry, and crush it with a spoon. Mix it with the finest sea salt you can find (try grinding it in a coffee grinder), put the resulting paste on a toothbrush, and lightly massage your teeth for a few minutes. Then rinse your mouth thoroughly. To protect your enamel, do this no more often than once every 2 weeks.

Coconut oil

Apply some oil to your teeth before brushing them, leave it there for 15-20 minutes, then thoroughly brush with your toothpaste. Repeat this 2 or 3 times a week.

Activated charcoal mask

Mix ground charcoal with water to get a sour-cream texture, then carefully apply it to your teeth. Leave it there for 2 minutes, and rinse your mouth thoroughly. After that, brush your teeth. Repeat this once or twice a week.

Banana peel whitener

Banana peel contains substances that dissolve dental plaque and help maintain the perfect color of your teeth. Rub the inside of the peel into your teeth from both sides, and wait for 5-7 minutes. Then brush your teeth and rinse your mouth. Repeat as often as you like.

Lemon mouthwash

This DIY mouthwash will help you whiten your teeth gradually and keep your breath fresh. Take 3 parts lemon juice and 1 part fine salt, mix them together, and rinse your mouth thoroughly after brushing your teeth. Use this method 2 or 3 times a week.
Warning: don’t use this mouthwash if you have inflammations in your mouth.

Basil leaves

Grind fresh basil leaves to make a puree, and use it regularly instead of your ordinary toothpaste to whiten your teeth and make them healthier. You can also apply it for 5-10 minutes before brushing your teeth as usual.

Aloe vera

To obtain a truly Hollywood smile, use fresh aloe vera juice or buy some natural gel made from this plant. Rub some into your teeth, massage them with a toothbrush, and rinse thoroughly. You can do this after each brushing, and after a couple of weeks your smile will be bright and sparkling white.

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