All Posts in Category: Cosmetic Dentistry

5 Oral Healthcare Tips for Moms-to-be

 

A lot of pregnant women skip dental visits thinking that dental treatments during pregnancy can harm their babies. The American Dental Association, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics all encourage women to get dental and oral healthcare while pregnant.

In fact, studies show that the bacteria from gum diseases can actually get into the bloodstream and target the fetus, potentially leading to premature labor and low-birth-weight babies.

Pregnancy offers an opportunity to educate pregnant women regarding oral health by providing a “teachable moment” in self-care and future child-care.

Here are top five oral healthcare tips for pregnant mothers:

  • 01 Know your facts and risks – Good oral health can reduce your risk of having a premature baby.
  • 02 Oral hygiene – Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste. Floss daily to keep your gums healthy. Remember, if you have good oral health habits, your child will too!If you experience vomiting, rinse with a cup of water containing a teaspoon of baking soda and wait an hour before brushing to avoid dental erosion.
  • 03 Diet – What you eat affects your baby’s health. Snack on healthy foods like cheese sticks, fruits, vegetables and nuts. Drink lots of water and low-fat milk. Eat high calcium food instead of acidic food, juices and sodas. Avoid drinks and any food loaded with sugar as they might lead to caries and affect your baby’s health. Chewing sugarless or xylitol-containing gum can help minimize your caries risk.
  • 04 Professional oral care – Get a dental check-up, it is completely safe to have most dental treatments while you are pregnant. Do not put off your dental visit until after you’ve had the baby.
  • 05 Book your baby’s first dental appointment as soon as you see his/her first teeth erupt. We offer children a dental home where they can have a long-term friendly relationship with their dentist.

What’s the right age to bring a child in for their first dental check-up?

In order to prevent oral and dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth appears or no later than his/her first birthday. Healthy habits start early in life. First birthday = First dental check-up.

Can a mother’s poor oral health status affect her baby’s oral health?

Yes, because the bacteria responsible for caries in a mother’s mouth are related to early childhood caries in their baby’s mouth. The same bacteria are transferred from mum to baby.

Mums and caregivers pass on the mentioned bacteria by sharing saliva, spoons, testing food before feeding it to the baby, cleaning off a pacifier in their mouth instead of with water and through various activities. So, make sure your mouth is healthy and taken care of before your baby is born. It’s important for pregnant mums to have their oral check-up as soon as possible, in order to treat and prevent any oral disease.

Read more at Dentcare blog:

What Parents Need to Know About the Transition From Milk Teeth to Permanent Teeth

What Causes Yellow Teeth in Kids

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Creating Brighter, Better Smiles

From subtle repairs to major procedures, cosmetic dentistry has evolved to improve every aspect of better smiles. From teeth whitening, to replacing missing teeth and everything else in between, smile enhancements are proven to boost a person’s overall appearance and self-confidence. At Dentcare Clinic, our cosmetic dentists work hard to create results that make you want to smile even more.

Today, cosmetic dentists have a variety of techniques and tools in their arsenal to reshape teeth, close gaps between teeth, fix broken or chipped teeth, restore worn teeth and even alter the length of your pearly whites.

In the UAE, smile makeovers are getting more popular than ever. Our dentists have been helping countless patients achieve the smile they truly desire through dental veneers.

Here’s a quick list of what cosmetic dentistry can offer you.

Teeth Whitening

At its best, in-office teeth whitening or “bleaching” restores your teeth’s natural,  youthful radiance. To get the best results, we suggest that you book a whitening consultation with your dentist/dental hygienist to discuss your concerns and expectations.

Dental Fillings

There’s no need to rely on unsightly (and sometimes weird-looking) metals to replace tooth structures lost to decay. Today, dentists make use of state-of-the-art composite resins and porcelain materials that naturally mimic the look, feel and function of natural teeth.

Crowns or Caps

Dentists use a crown to cover or “cap” a damaged tooth. These are made to match the color of your natural teeth, and can be used to improve your teeth’s appearance, shape or alignment.

Bridges

Bridges also known as fixed removable dentures, literally bridge the gap created by one or more missing teeth.

Veneers

Veneers are very thin custom-made laminates crafted of tooth-colored materials designed to cover the front side of the teeth. These are a great option for correcting stained, chipped or crooked teeth.

Dental Implants

Dental implants are artificial tooth roots surgically fused in the jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge for those who have lost a tooth or teeth. For almost 50 years, implants have been recognized by dental experts as procedure of choice for teeth replacement.

Bonding

Through bonding, cosmetic dentists are able to fix chipped teeth, close spaces between teeth or cover the entire external surface of a tooth using materials (porcelain and composite resins) that look naturally like the original tooth.

Periodontal Plastic Surgery

Periodontal plastic surgery is performed to restore the form, function and correct irregularities in the gums. According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the real long-term goal of any periodontal surgery is to increase the life expectancy of the teeth and their usefulness; it is not a cure for periodontal disease.

Be sure to ask your dentist any questions you may have about techniques used to improve your smile and get better smiles. To get the best results, remember to communicate your expectations with your dentist prior to any procedure.

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Choosing The Best Crown For Your Tooth

Are you thinking of getting a dental crown? If so, then this guide may be of help to you in deciding which one fits the bill perfectly.

There’s no single type of dental crown that offers the best solution for all types of patients. So, if you’re getting a dental crown, ask your dentist about the different types of crowns available. If you are after durability and superior aesthetics, the right choice of material will really matter. Here are few things to consider when choosing the best crown for your tooth.

Gold CrownThe Best Crown For Your Tooth - Gold crown

All-metal dental crowns are the most durable type of cap. They don’t easily crack or break. They’re also very biocompatible; they will not wear down opposing teeth unlike porcelain crowns.

If you’re up for durability, gold crown is a solid choice – although it’s not much of a practical option for aesthetics. For the most part, metal is highly dependable in terms of sturdiness and optimum strength. This material is least likely to chip off, break, or crack. However, it’s not quite the most attractive choice because of the less subtle color. If you need a dental crown for your teeth at the back part of your mouth, though, gold should not be an issue.

All-porcelain/All-ceramic Crowns

The advantage of all-porcelain/all-ceramic crown is aesthetic pleasure. If cosmetic consideration is your concern, then they’re your perfect choice. However, all-porcelain crowns cannot match the durability of all-metal crowns, and they cost about 10-20% more.The Best Crown For Your Tooth - ceramic crown

Porcelain or all-ceramic dental crowns are great in terms of appearance and maximum durability. This is the common choice for a crown material when you need one for your front tooth since it looks quite like your original tooth. The only thing you will have to factor in when deciding to get a porcelain crown is the cost since it’s usually 10 to 20 percent more expensive that the all-metal ones.

Ceramic crowns are great for upper front teeth. However, for bicuspids, molars, or lower front teeth, they’re prone to fracture.

Porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) Crowns are Practical in Terms of the Price

If you’re on the fence when it comes to choosing between all-ceramic and all-metal crowns, then you may consider the PFM or porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns as a viable choice. This material usually makes up for whatever may be missing with metal crowns or the price point that comes with all-porcelain.

The Best Crown For Your Tooth - PFM crown

As for the aesthetics, PFM crowns are not as translucent as all-porcelain. Yet, these are good enough and look more like your natural teeth than what all-metal can offer. However, if you have receding gum lines, the metal edge of the PFM crown tends to show, thus spoiling the rather natural appearance of the tooth that you’re aiming for.

These crowns are the middle ground between all-ceramic and all-metal caps. PFM crowns are structured with an overlying surface of porcelain that is combined to an underlying thimble of metal. This combination offers the benefits of both all-ceramic and all-metal crowns.

PFM crowns are durable but not as strong as all-metal crowns. Dentists usually place PFM crowns on the back teeth. Additionally, PFM crowns produce pleasing aesthetics.

Porcelain-fused-to-metal caps can have some disadvantages:

  • If a tooth’s gum line recedes, the edge of the cap’s underlying metal may show. This might not look good on the front teeth.
  • When the bite of a PFM cap is adjusted, the porcelain surface may wear the opposing teeth.
  • Portions of the cap’s porcelain covering can possibly fracture

Understand why a dental crown has been recommended by your dentist

Getting a dental crown may serve many important functions. Make sure to get a proper explanation from your dentist as to why you need a dental crown. Other dental procedures may be a better choice if your tooth doesn’t really need caps.

Consider the Cost

Generally, PFM and even all-metal crowns are priced about 30 to 45 percent cheaper than the all-ceramic options. There are some points to think about such as the lack of benefits for replacing dental crowns under 5 years old, as well as the absence of coverage for crowns placed for cosmetic reasons.

Consider these things before getting a dental crown. It’s always important to do proper research to know more about your options. You surely don’t want to have regrets over your dental care decisions. Be sure to keep all these points in mind when thinking about getting a dental crown to obtain maximum benefits without going beyond your budget.

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Easy Ways To Improve Your Dental Health

We’ve all heard that if we want healthy teeth, we should brush twice a day, floss once a day, and schedule regular dental cleaning appointments twice a year.

Definitely keep doing those things, but if you want to step up your oral health game, here are a few easy ways to do that.

Replace Your Toothbrush RegularlyImprove Your Dental Health - brush

One of the simplest ways you can improve your dental health and hygiene is to replace your toothbrush on a regular basis. Vigorous brushing will make the bristles fray and reduce the brush’s cleaning ability, but that’s not the only reason toothbrushes should be replaced often.

A lot of the bacteria we brush off our teeth stays on the bristles of our toothbrushes. Proper storage–meaning storing the toothbrush upright and letting it dry out between uses–can keep a toothbrush from getting smelly and nasty too fast, but it’s still important to replace your toothbrush at least every 3-4 months.

Use A Tongue-Scraper

Brushing your teeth twice daily is a no-brainer, but don’t forget your tongue! The same bacteria and gunk that flourishes on teeth can hide on your tongue too. Using a tongue scraper or just running your toothbrush over your tongue will leave your mouth feeling much fresher than if you only focus on your teeth and gums.

Improve Your Dental Health - brushing teeth

Don’t Brush Too Hard

Sometimes it seems like we need to really work at those teeth when we brush, to get absolutely all of the food particles and plaque out. However, if we brush too hard, we risk scraping away at the tooth enamel, which is your teeth’s first line of defense against decay. Brush gently or use a toothbrush with soft bristles to avoid damaging your teeth. How to Brush Your Teeth the Right Way

Eat Teeth-Friendly Foods

Many foods are bad for your teeth. Sugar and carbs feed the harmful bacteria living in your mouth and acidic drinks erode tooth enamel. Avoiding some of these foods will help, but there are also plenty of foods you can eat that are actually good for your teeth.Improve Your Dental Health - Apple

Adding more cheese, yogurt, leafy greens, apples, carrots, celery, and almonds to your diet will make your teeth happy, whether by scrubbing them as you eat, fighting bad bacteria, treating gum disease, neutralizing your mouth’s pH, or remineralizing your enamel. Healthy Foods List: Seven Best Foods For Your Teeth

We’d Love To See How Your Teeth Are Doing!

If it’s been a while since your last dental exam, we’d love to see how your teeth are doing, and we’ll be excited to see how adopting these simple habits will affect your oral health by the time we see you again!

We Love Our Patients!

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A Chance to Improve your Smile

When you first meet someone, the first thing you notice about them is their smile. Now that techniques and methods have advanced dramatically, more and more people are considering cosmetic dentistry. Dentcare clinic, provides an excellent and highly professional treatment establishment to improve your smile.

With treatments and skills as advanced as they are, it’s just as easy to get cosmetic dental treatment as it is to get a haircut. Cosmetic dentistry can dramatically improve your oral hygiene, as well as your confidence. This is turn can reduce the chances of issues relating to poor or neglected oral and dental health, which in turn can affect your overall physical health.

Dentcare offers an extensive range of treatments, from teeth whitening to dental implants. If you visit our clinic you will be able to have consultations with our professional team of highly qualified and experienced dentists. They will assess and advise you on the best treatment plan for you, and during your treatment will at all times ensure that you have a comfortable and stress-free experience.

We here at Dentcare understand that a trip to the dentist can be daunting and maybe even scary at times, which is why we pride ourselves on our patient care and gentle approach. We provide a calm and tranquil environment and our staff are always happy to help.

What treatments are available to me?

At Dentcare Clinic, cosmetic dentistry begins with a consultation. You will be able to discuss all possible treatments with your dentist and formulate a treatment plan. Our dentists have an enviable reputation within the aesthetic dentistry field, including for their construction of implants, porcelain veneers, teeth whitening and restoration. We are also able to custom-build and fit braces which are almost undetectable due to their transparent appearance. They are several steps on from traditional metal braces and can correct most minor teeth misalignment.

Our dentists here at Dentcare possess the understanding and knowledge to undertake the most cutting-edge and advanced techniques within cosmetic dentistry.

We all look forward to welcoming all new and potential dental patients, whilst continuing to maintain the optimum dental health of our current patients.

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Are Baby Root Canals Really Necessary?

Up to this day, the words “root canal” still strikes fear into the hearts of many. What happens if you find out that your child needs one too?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends parents to bring children to a dentist after the first tooth erupts and no later than 12 months of age. Through regular checkups, your child’s dentist can detect and prevent tooth decay before they get worse.

If a tooth is severely injured or decayed, your child’s dentist may recommend doing a root canal treatment.

What’s a baby root canal?

When a baby tooth has a very deep cavity that affects part of the nerve, it will most likely need nerve treatment most commonly referred to as a baby root canal. This procedure involves removing part of the affected nerve and placing a medicated material over it. The tooth is then covered with a crown (“cap”) which is a more long-lasting restoration for the tooth.

Are root canals safe for kids?

Yes. Performed properly, baby root canals are safe for children. The materials used in the procedure are compatible with the body and do not cause harm.

Are baby root canals necessary for children or should they be avoided?

If a tooth can be effectively treated and saved with a baby root canal, then this is the most advisable treatment to choose. Despite being “just a baby tooth that will eventually fall out,” the tooth is necessary to hold the space for the permanent tooth that is developing below it. If left untreated, the infection may also spread downwards and affect the developing permanent tooth. In addition, it may cause pain, affect your child’s eating habits, concentration in school and possibly cause a bad infection that may require antibiotics or hospitalization.

Any advice for parents that are contemplating the baby root canal treatment for their child?

Baby root canals are not as complicated as adult root canals. They usually require a single visit and most often the experience is similar to getting a normal filling. Parents should also ask their pediatric dentist all the questions they need to ask before treatment, so as to ease any anxiety that usually comes up when the treatment is recommended.

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5 Common Lifestyle Habits That Can Damage Your Teeth

There are a number of habits that can potentially damage the teeth and some of them are a lot more common than we think.

1- Increased intake of acidic food and drink

This can include but is not restricted to citric and acidic fruits and juices, fizzy drinks including sparkling water, vinegar and excessive alcohol consumption. These damaging foods and drinks lead to a condition known as acid erosion which is characterized by thinning and destruction of the top layer of the tooth, known as the enamel. The condition is non-reversible. The enamel is very strong but over time when subjected to all these acidic products degenerates and thins out exposing the inside of the tooth (which can also in turn be damaged) and this can lead to an increase in sensitivity and pain symptoms as well as increased susceptibility to decay. It also weakens the tooth.

2- Grinding and clenching teeth

This is a habit which is increasing steadily and seen much more frequently in many patients who present to us. There are many complex factors which lead patients to grind or clench their teeth and we see it more frequently at times of anxiety and stress. Other factors that play a role are genetics, arthritic changes in the bone and changes in the cartilage of the jaw joint, anatomy and muscular attachments, trauma, etc. Unfortunately, many patients who suffer from this condition are unaware of it and don’t realize they grind or clench (as they are usually doing it subconsciously or in their sleep) until they are informed by a clinician that there are signs of this in their mouth. If left unchecked, this condition can lead to a variety of problems and symptoms for the patient including thinning and wear of the teeth, jaw and muscular pain and headaches, difficulty in opening the mouth and chewing and cracking of the teeth.

3- Overbrushing teeth

This is usually coupled with the use of a hard toothbrush and/or an abrasive toothpaste. This leads to a condition known as abrasion. Abrasion is characterized by recession of the gum line where the overbrushing takes place and when left unchecked leads to an eventual formation of cavities at the neck of the tooth known as abrasion cavities. These can lead to severe symptoms of pain and sensitivity and it is often necessary to restore these teeth with a filling material to reduce the symptoms and effects of the abrasion. Occasionally, if the abrasion has been occurring for several years, gum surgery may be necessary to correct the recession of the gums.

4- Using non-fluoride toothpaste

The use of non-fluoride toothpaste is becoming more and more popular across the world owing to some negative advertising about the effects of fluoride on the body. Fluoride in very large doses can be toxic and can cause systemic problems however the amount of fluoride in toothpaste is minimal and is nowhere near those threshold doses.

It has been well documented with established studies that fluoride is critical in reducing the effects of decay causing foods to our teeth. Fluoride can also help remineralise tooth structure which has already been damaged (when in the early stages) hence reducing the need to fill those affected teeth. The adult dental health surveys and the child dental health surveys carried out in the UK show significant reduction of decay in patients following the introduction of fluoride to drinking water in certain cities with no adverse effects on general health and this, along with other well established clinical studies are proof enough of how effective fluoride can be to create a barrier against decay.

What is less well known is that smoking is directly linked to the progression of gum disease.

5- Smoking

Smoking has a well-known adverse effect on the general health. However, what is less well known is that smoking is directly linked to the progression of gum disease. Gum disease is a very loose term used to describe any disease that affects the supporting structures of the tooth, namely the gums and bone. If left untreated gum disease progresses to a form of the disease known as advanced periodontitis which is characterized by significant bone loss and the loosening of the teeth. There are of course other factors that cause gum disease, mainly poor oral hygiene, however smoking has been linked directly with the progression of gum disease and the disease effects appear to be multiplied in patients who smoke.

Helpful prevention tips and replacement options:

● The effects of erosion unfortunately are non-reversible and when the disease progresses significantly we may need to consider restorative options such as fillings and crowns to protect the teeth. To reduce the effect of early erosion we must consider a change in dietary habits. Limiting our intake of acidic foods will help reduce the effect of erosion. This of course does not mean cutting out on eating healthy fruits, but changing the frequency of acidic intake, instead of 3 oranges or juices a day, consider having one. We can also change our diet from acidic fruits such as oranges, apples, pineapples and kiwi to non-acidic fruits such as pears and bananas. The use of a straw helps reduce the effects of erosion significantly as the fluid bypasses the teeth upon entry into the mouth hence reducing the effect it has on the teeth. Regular sips of still water following an acidic intake can help neutralize the pH of the mouth hence also reducing the effect of erosion. We must also consider when to brush after eating, as brushing immediately after eating or drinking something acidic multiplies the effect of erosion by pushing the acid directly onto the teeth, hence brushing in the morning should be considered prior to having breakfast if the breakfast contains acidic elements such as orange juice.

● Owing to the fact that teeth grinding is usually carried out subconsciously and that there are many factors that cause it, grinding is a very difficult condition to treat.

Treatment is usually confined to a minimalistic approach of:

  1. Awareness of the condition
  2. Physiotherapy exercises
  3. Reduction in local factors contributing to grinding such as high fillings
  4. Construction of a bite guard or shield which can also act as a de-programmer to reduce the effect of grinding
  5. Occasionally a referral to a physiotherapist may be necessary.

● The effects of abrasion can be reduced by changing the hardness of the toothbrush you are using to a soft or medium toothbrush. The finer the bristles the less abrasive they are. There is a fine line between overbrushing and ineffective brushing and this needs to be pointed out to you by your dentist or hygienist. The mode of brushing also needs to be altered from a scrubbing motion to a softer round or sweeping motion. If you are using an abrasive toothpaste (some whitening toothpastes are extremely abrasive) then consider changing to a milder, less damaging one.

● The use of modern electric toothbrushes has really helped combat this condition as they are equipped with sensors known as pressure sensors which identify when you are pushing too hard onto your teeth and reduce the pressure by either slowing down or stopping, or by flashing a red light to alert you to the damage that is being done. The better brushes do both hence minimizing the damage to the teeth. Some toothpastes on the market are made specifically for patients who suffer with erosion and these can help remineralise the teeth, although the remineralisation effect is very minor.

There is no substitute in protecting our teeth more effectively than the use of fluoride toothpaste.

● There is no substitute in protecting our teeth more effectively than the use of fluoride toothpaste. Herbal toothpastes may claim to have an antibacterial effect however these do not help remineralise teeth which are already decaying. The correct use of fluoride toothpaste in the right quantities should have no detrimental overall effect on the teeth or the general health whatsoever.

● Smoking is a very difficult habit to break. Support from the people around you as well as health care professionals will help make the process less daunting and you’d be more likely to succeed. There are many nicotine alternatives on the market such as patches, gums, inhalators and e-cigarettes, however the effects are still debatable as to whether they cause harm to the body. Other ways include the use of tablets taken daily to help reduce the cravings and even hypnotherapy. Ask your medical professional for help and they will be able to point you in the right direction.

Are there any measures to reverse this?

Unfortunately, many of the conditions listed above are non-reversible and the principal aim of treatment is to reduce the damage done and stop any further deterioration. Occasionally, interventional dentistry is necessary to try and reduce the impact of the damage carried out and this can be in the form of fillings, more complex restorations such as crowns and bite guards or occasionally even more complex surgical treatments need to be carried out.

Any further advice?

The best advice that can be given to any patient is to regularly visit your dentist to help identify any of the conditions listed above as well as any other conditions or diseases and minimize the effect early. Early intervention always yields better results and better prognosis long term. Most patients believe that if they are symptom-free then they are disease free and unfortunately this is simply not correct. An asymptomatic mouth is not necessarily a healthy one and problems may be brewing which can be very difficult to treat if left unchecked.

The role of the dentist is not restricted to treating any illnesses but also to give advice to prevent future problems and can be an invaluable source of information on how to keep your mouth healthy and disease free. Remember a healthy smile reflects a healthy body!

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What Parents Need to Know About the Transition From Milk Teeth to Permanent Teeth

Children’s milk teeth begin to develop even before they are born and most kids have their full set of 20 teeth by the time they turn three years old. These milk teeth start to fall out by the age of six or seven, making way for permanent teeth.

What are milk teeth?

Milk teeth are also commonly known as primary, deciduous or baby teeth. Humans have two sets of teeth in their lifetime. The milk teeth set starts to erupt from the age of 6 months and completely exfoliates between the age of 10 to 12 years. Since the tenure of milk teeth is extended until the mentioned age range, it’s quite important to keep these teeth healthy and cavity free. This lays a healthy foundation for the permanent teeth to erupt properly.

What should parents do when their child’s milk teeth haven’t fallen out as yet, but the child’s permanent teeth have started to erupt?

When a child’s set of milk teeth have not exfoliated but their permanent teeth have started to erupt, the milk teeth should either be wiggled out or professionally extracted. However, these usually fall out naturally when permanent teeth are right underneath them. Sometimes due to space concerns between the child’s teeth or other factors, permanent teeth begin to erupt in wrong direction. Hence, there is no active force left on the milk teeth to help it fall out naturally. This force should then be applied from outside by either biting on hard fruits, wiggling or professionally extracting the tooth.

When do permanent teeth start to erupt?

  • Upper and lower front teeth: age 6 to 8 years
  • Canines: age 9 to 10 years
  • Molars: age 10 to 12 years
    *Plus or minus 6 months to 12 months

Do you have any tips for parents during this process?

Tips on exfoliating primary teeth:

  • Provide your child with soft food as wobbly teeth can potentially lead to the sensation of soreness within their mouth.
  • Wiggle the primary teeth as and when possible.
  • Gentle brushing is fine but skipping brushing completely in the area of concern is not recommended.
  • In case of severe pain or discomfort during the stages of exfoliation, professional extraction can be considered. Usually, it’s a natural phenomenon of growth and does not require any treatment.

If you have any queries, don’t hesitate to get in touch with one of our Specialist Pediatric Dentists at Dentcare Dental Clinic in Dubai.

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What Causes Yellow Teeth in Kids

This is one of the most common questions I get from parents of 6 and 7 year-olds. Even though there are multiple reasons why your child’s permanent teeth are yellow, the most common reason is the intrinsic color difference between the permanent teeth and baby teeth.

What Causes Yellow Teeth in Kids

This yellow appearance is also enhanced by the fact that they sit right next to baby teeth. This contrast between they very white baby teeth makes the grown up teeth look even more yellow.Yellow Teeth in Kids

Primary teeth have a milky white appearance when compared to the sometimes yellowish appearance of the permanent teeth. Primary teeth have thinner enamel, less amount of dentin and dentin in primary teeth is less yellow in color.

Permanent teeth have a greater amount of dentin, which is yellow in color. Since enamel is translucent the color of the dentin shows through. When all the permanent teeth have erupted the color will blend and appear uniform.

What can be done?

Young permanent teeth have very large nerve canals when they erupt and these teeth are more transparent, leading to a yellower appearance. As we age, the canals slowly calcify and the tooth will naturally lighten. 

Bleaching Kids Teeth

As for bleaching, we advise parents to wait until all of their permanent teeth to erupt (usually 12/13). Otherwise when the new adult erupt, they will not match his bleached primary teeth.

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4 Tips for a Brighter Smile at Work

So you have a solid routine of brushing and flossing twice a day, and visiting your dentist for regular checkups, but what about the times when you’re at work? What can you do to keep your pearly whites pearly while you’re in the office throughout the day? We came up with a list of tips to make sure you’re being tooth-friendly, even when you’re away from home.

  • Buy a travel-sized toothbrush and toothpaste, and a small floss container. Keep them in your purse or bag throughout the day, and take advantage of opportunities to spruce up your teeth. This will not only halt tooth decay, but have short-term benefits like freshening your breath, whitening your teeth by preventing stains, and getting embarrassing food particles out of your teeth!
  • Rinse after eating and drinking. On your way back from lunch, grab a bottled water and give your teeth a quick rinse before continuing your work day. This is so easy to do, and takes just a moment after a snack or meal. If you don’t have a bathroom available, just take a drink of water and swish it around in your mouth before swallowing.
  • When you do snack, snack healthy. Eating vegetables, nuts and cheese while forgoing candy and soda will keep you slim and your teeth decay-free. Also, crunchy foods, like apples or celery, stimulate saliva production while you eat them, which helps rinse your teeth clean of bacteria, and the high water content in these foods buffers their sugar content.
  • Drink your coffee from a straw. Coffee and tea can stain your teeth if you drink them directly from a cup. While giving up your morning cup of joe may be too much to ask, consider drinking through a straw. It protects your teeth from stains and the wear on your enamel that acidic drinks cause. Be selective, though. Most regular straws break down and leach chemicals when immersed in hot drinks. Look for paper straws or other products that don’t break down in hot liquids.

Follow these tips to keep your teeth glistening, and don’t forget to visit your dentist regularly!

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