All Posts Tagged: Child Teeth

5 Oral Healthcare Tips for Moms-to-be

 

A lot of pregnant women skip dental visits thinking that dental treatments during pregnancy can harm their babies. The American Dental Association, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Academy of Pediatrics all encourage women to get dental and oral healthcare while pregnant.

In fact, studies show that the bacteria from gum diseases can actually get into the bloodstream and target the fetus, potentially leading to premature labor and low-birth-weight babies.

Pregnancy offers an opportunity to educate pregnant women regarding oral health by providing a “teachable moment” in self-care and future child-care.

Here are top five oral healthcare tips for pregnant mothers:

  • 01 Know your facts and risks – Good oral health can reduce your risk of having a premature baby.
  • 02 Oral hygiene – Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste. Floss daily to keep your gums healthy. Remember, if you have good oral health habits, your child will too!If you experience vomiting, rinse with a cup of water containing a teaspoon of baking soda and wait an hour before brushing to avoid dental erosion.
  • 03 Diet – What you eat affects your baby’s health. Snack on healthy foods like cheese sticks, fruits, vegetables and nuts. Drink lots of water and low-fat milk. Eat high calcium food instead of acidic food, juices and sodas. Avoid drinks and any food loaded with sugar as they might lead to caries and affect your baby’s health. Chewing sugarless or xylitol-containing gum can help minimize your caries risk.
  • 04 Professional oral care – Get a dental check-up, it is completely safe to have most dental treatments while you are pregnant. Do not put off your dental visit until after you’ve had the baby.
  • 05 Book your baby’s first dental appointment as soon as you see his/her first teeth erupt. We offer children a dental home where they can have a long-term friendly relationship with their dentist.

What’s the right age to bring a child in for their first dental check-up?

In order to prevent oral and dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth appears or no later than his/her first birthday. Healthy habits start early in life. First birthday = First dental check-up.

Can a mother’s poor oral health status affect her baby’s oral health?

Yes, because the bacteria responsible for caries in a mother’s mouth are related to early childhood caries in their baby’s mouth. The same bacteria are transferred from mum to baby.

Mums and caregivers pass on the mentioned bacteria by sharing saliva, spoons, testing food before feeding it to the baby, cleaning off a pacifier in their mouth instead of with water and through various activities. So, make sure your mouth is healthy and taken care of before your baby is born. It’s important for pregnant mums to have their oral check-up as soon as possible, in order to treat and prevent any oral disease.

Read more at Dentcare blog:

What Parents Need to Know About the Transition From Milk Teeth to Permanent Teeth

What Causes Yellow Teeth in Kids

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Are Baby Root Canals Really Necessary?

Up to this day, the words “root canal” still strikes fear into the hearts of many. What happens if you find out that your child needs one too?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends parents to bring children to a dentist after the first tooth erupts and no later than 12 months of age. Through regular checkups, your child’s dentist can detect and prevent tooth decay before they get worse.

If a tooth is severely injured or decayed, your child’s dentist may recommend doing a root canal treatment.

What’s a baby root canal?

When a baby tooth has a very deep cavity that affects part of the nerve, it will most likely need nerve treatment most commonly referred to as a baby root canal. This procedure involves removing part of the affected nerve and placing a medicated material over it. The tooth is then covered with a crown (“cap”) which is a more long-lasting restoration for the tooth.

Are root canals safe for kids?

Yes. Performed properly, baby root canals are safe for children. The materials used in the procedure are compatible with the body and do not cause harm.

Are baby root canals necessary for children or should they be avoided?

If a tooth can be effectively treated and saved with a baby root canal, then this is the most advisable treatment to choose. Despite being “just a baby tooth that will eventually fall out,” the tooth is necessary to hold the space for the permanent tooth that is developing below it. If left untreated, the infection may also spread downwards and affect the developing permanent tooth. In addition, it may cause pain, affect your child’s eating habits, concentration in school and possibly cause a bad infection that may require antibiotics or hospitalization.

Any advice for parents that are contemplating the baby root canal treatment for their child?

Baby root canals are not as complicated as adult root canals. They usually require a single visit and most often the experience is similar to getting a normal filling. Parents should also ask their pediatric dentist all the questions they need to ask before treatment, so as to ease any anxiety that usually comes up when the treatment is recommended.

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What Parents Need to Know About the Transition From Milk Teeth to Permanent Teeth

Children’s milk teeth begin to develop even before they are born and most kids have their full set of 20 teeth by the time they turn three years old. These milk teeth start to fall out by the age of six or seven, making way for permanent teeth.

What are milk teeth?

Milk teeth are also commonly known as primary, deciduous or baby teeth. Humans have two sets of teeth in their lifetime. The milk teeth set starts to erupt from the age of 6 months and completely exfoliates between the age of 10 to 12 years. Since the tenure of milk teeth is extended until the mentioned age range, it’s quite important to keep these teeth healthy and cavity free. This lays a healthy foundation for the permanent teeth to erupt properly.

What should parents do when their child’s milk teeth haven’t fallen out as yet, but the child’s permanent teeth have started to erupt?

When a child’s set of milk teeth have not exfoliated but their permanent teeth have started to erupt, the milk teeth should either be wiggled out or professionally extracted. However, these usually fall out naturally when permanent teeth are right underneath them. Sometimes due to space concerns between the child’s teeth or other factors, permanent teeth begin to erupt in wrong direction. Hence, there is no active force left on the milk teeth to help it fall out naturally. This force should then be applied from outside by either biting on hard fruits, wiggling or professionally extracting the tooth.

When do permanent teeth start to erupt?

  • Upper and lower front teeth: age 6 to 8 years
  • Canines: age 9 to 10 years
  • Molars: age 10 to 12 years
    *Plus or minus 6 months to 12 months

Do you have any tips for parents during this process?

Tips on exfoliating primary teeth:

  • Provide your child with soft food as wobbly teeth can potentially lead to the sensation of soreness within their mouth.
  • Wiggle the primary teeth as and when possible.
  • Gentle brushing is fine but skipping brushing completely in the area of concern is not recommended.
  • In case of severe pain or discomfort during the stages of exfoliation, professional extraction can be considered. Usually, it’s a natural phenomenon of growth and does not require any treatment.

If you have any queries, don’t hesitate to get in touch with one of our Specialist Pediatric Dentists at Dentcare Dental Clinic in Dubai.

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What Causes Yellow Teeth in Kids

This is one of the most common questions I get from parents of 6 and 7 year-olds. Even though there are multiple reasons why your child’s permanent teeth are yellow, the most common reason is the intrinsic color difference between the permanent teeth and baby teeth.

What Causes Yellow Teeth in Kids

This yellow appearance is also enhanced by the fact that they sit right next to baby teeth. This contrast between they very white baby teeth makes the grown up teeth look even more yellow.Yellow Teeth in Kids

Primary teeth have a milky white appearance when compared to the sometimes yellowish appearance of the permanent teeth. Primary teeth have thinner enamel, less amount of dentin and dentin in primary teeth is less yellow in color.

Permanent teeth have a greater amount of dentin, which is yellow in color. Since enamel is translucent the color of the dentin shows through. When all the permanent teeth have erupted the color will blend and appear uniform.

What can be done?

Young permanent teeth have very large nerve canals when they erupt and these teeth are more transparent, leading to a yellower appearance. As we age, the canals slowly calcify and the tooth will naturally lighten. 

Bleaching Kids Teeth

As for bleaching, we advise parents to wait until all of their permanent teeth to erupt (usually 12/13). Otherwise when the new adult erupt, they will not match his bleached primary teeth.

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