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20/04/2020

All Posts Tagged: Dental Crown

Choosing The Best Crown For Your Tooth

Are you thinking of getting a dental crown? If so, then this guide may be of help to you in deciding which one fits the bill perfectly.

There’s no single type of dental crown that offers the best solution for all types of patients. So, if you’re getting a dental crown, ask your dentist about the different types of crowns available. If you are after durability and superior aesthetics, the right choice of material will really matter. Here are few things to consider when choosing the best crown for your tooth.

Gold CrownThe Best Crown For Your Tooth - Gold crown

All-metal dental crowns are the most durable type of cap. They don’t easily crack or break. They’re also very biocompatible; they will not wear down opposing teeth unlike porcelain crowns.

If you’re up for durability, gold crown is a solid choice – although it’s not much of a practical option for aesthetics. For the most part, metal is highly dependable in terms of sturdiness and optimum strength. This material is least likely to chip off, break, or crack. However, it’s not quite the most attractive choice because of the less subtle color. If you need a dental crown for your teeth at the back part of your mouth, though, gold should not be an issue.

All-porcelain/All-ceramic Crowns

The advantage of all-porcelain/all-ceramic crown is aesthetic pleasure. If cosmetic consideration is your concern, then they’re your perfect choice. However, all-porcelain crowns cannot match the durability of all-metal crowns, and they cost about 10-20% more.The Best Crown For Your Tooth - ceramic crown

Porcelain or all-ceramic dental crowns are great in terms of appearance and maximum durability. This is the common choice for a crown material when you need one for your front tooth since it looks quite like your original tooth. The only thing you will have to factor in when deciding to get a porcelain crown is the cost since it’s usually 10 to 20 percent more expensive that the all-metal ones.

Ceramic crowns are great for upper front teeth. However, for bicuspids, molars, or lower front teeth, they’re prone to fracture.

Porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) Crowns are Practical in Terms of the Price

If you’re on the fence when it comes to choosing between all-ceramic and all-metal crowns, then you may consider the PFM or porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns as a viable choice. This material usually makes up for whatever may be missing with metal crowns or the price point that comes with all-porcelain.

The Best Crown For Your Tooth - PFM crown

As for the aesthetics, PFM crowns are not as translucent as all-porcelain. Yet, these are good enough and look more like your natural teeth than what all-metal can offer. However, if you have receding gum lines, the metal edge of the PFM crown tends to show, thus spoiling the rather natural appearance of the tooth that you’re aiming for.

These crowns are the middle ground between all-ceramic and all-metal caps. PFM crowns are structured with an overlying surface of porcelain that is combined to an underlying thimble of metal. This combination offers the benefits of both all-ceramic and all-metal crowns.

PFM crowns are durable but not as strong as all-metal crowns. Dentists usually place PFM crowns on the back teeth. Additionally, PFM crowns produce pleasing aesthetics.

Porcelain-fused-to-metal caps can have some disadvantages:

  • If a tooth’s gum line recedes, the edge of the cap’s underlying metal may show. This might not look good on the front teeth.
  • When the bite of a PFM cap is adjusted, the porcelain surface may wear the opposing teeth.
  • Portions of the cap’s porcelain covering can possibly fracture

Understand why a dental crown has been recommended by your dentist

Getting a dental crown may serve many important functions. Make sure to get a proper explanation from your dentist as to why you need a dental crown. Other dental procedures may be a better choice if your tooth doesn’t really need caps.

Consider the Cost

Generally, PFM and even all-metal crowns are priced about 30 to 45 percent cheaper than the all-ceramic options. There are some points to think about such as the lack of benefits for replacing dental crowns under 5 years old, as well as the absence of coverage for crowns placed for cosmetic reasons.

Consider these things before getting a dental crown. It’s always important to do proper research to know more about your options. You surely don’t want to have regrets over your dental care decisions. Be sure to keep all these points in mind when thinking about getting a dental crown to obtain maximum benefits without going beyond your budget.

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Are Baby Root Canals Really Necessary?

Up to this day, the words “root canal” still strikes fear into the hearts of many. What happens if you find out that your child needs one too?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends parents to bring children to a dentist after the first tooth erupts and no later than 12 months of age. Through regular checkups, your child’s dentist can detect and prevent tooth decay before they get worse.

If a tooth is severely injured or decayed, your child’s dentist may recommend doing a root canal treatment.

What’s a baby root canal?

When a baby tooth has a very deep cavity that affects part of the nerve, it will most likely need nerve treatment most commonly referred to as a baby root canal. This procedure involves removing part of the affected nerve and placing a medicated material over it. The tooth is then covered with a crown (“cap”) which is a more long-lasting restoration for the tooth.

Are root canals safe for kids?

Yes. Performed properly, baby root canals are safe for children. The materials used in the procedure are compatible with the body and do not cause harm.

Are baby root canals necessary for children or should they be avoided?

If a tooth can be effectively treated and saved with a baby root canal, then this is the most advisable treatment to choose. Despite being “just a baby tooth that will eventually fall out,” the tooth is necessary to hold the space for the permanent tooth that is developing below it. If left untreated, the infection may also spread downwards and affect the developing permanent tooth. In addition, it may cause pain, affect your child’s eating habits, concentration in school and possibly cause a bad infection that may require antibiotics or hospitalization.

Any advice for parents that are contemplating the baby root canal treatment for their child?

Baby root canals are not as complicated as adult root canals. They usually require a single visit and most often the experience is similar to getting a normal filling. Parents should also ask their pediatric dentist all the questions they need to ask before treatment, so as to ease any anxiety that usually comes up when the treatment is recommended.

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hollywood smile

The Power of Smiling and the Reasons to Keep Smiling

The daily interaction with my patients has enriched me in both professionally and personally. After 15 years of practicing dentistry I have seen time and again how people that smile are happier, look healthier and live longer. These patients generally take few or no medications and have a “clean” medical history. When I run into one of these “happy and healthy old patients”, I ask them what they do to stay happy and healthy. The common answer is: Smile!

hollywood smile

1. A natural remedy

Studies have shown that smiling releases serotonin and endorphins. We can help our body release these brain chemicals by laughing.

2. Relieves Stress

Smiling helps prevent us from looking tired, worn down, and overwhelmed. When you are stressed, take time to smile. You will feel better.

3. Boosts Your Immune System

Smiling improves immune function, possibly because you are more relaxed. Have you noticed that “Happy People” don’t get sick as often as unhappy people?

4. Lowers Your Blood Pressure

Sit for a few minutes and take a reading. Then smile for a minute and take another reading while still smiling. You will see a difference.

5- Changes Moods

When someone is smiling they brighten up the room, change situations and the moods of others. A smiling person brings happiness to others.

6. Makes You Look Younger and More Attractive

We are naturally attracted to smiles. The muscles used to smile lift the face, making a person appear younger. Avoid surgery: Just smile more. You’ll look younger and feel better!

7. Improves your Self-Esteem

Your smile conveys friendliness; it makes you approachable. People who smile appear more confident, and are more likely to be promoted. Put on a smile at meetings and appointments and see the results!

 8. Helps You Stay Positive

Try this test: Smile. Now try to think of something negative without losing the smile. Hard, isn’t it? Smiling can cure anxiety and depression.

9. IT IS FREE!

ARE YOUR TEETH KEEPING YOU FROM SMILING?

If you are uncomfortable with the appearance of your teeth, the dentist can help you bring back your smile!  A simple cleaning, teeth whitening, crowns or veneers could drastically improve your health and self-esteem.

At Dentcare Clinic, we are fully committed to helping patients achieve a healthy, beautiful smile. For more information about teeth whitening, then please contact the team: dentcarecenter@gmail.com+971-4-4370111.

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When is a Root Canal Needed?

When the nerve inside the tooth dies, becomes severely infected or inflamed, a root canal treatment is necessary if you want to keep your tooth. The other alternative to a “root canal” is to have the tooth removed. Many people are afraid of “getting a root canal”; however, once the tooth is completely numb, and the infection has been controlled with antibiotics, root canal treatment is completely painless.

Sometimes no symptoms are present; however, signs you may need a root canal include:

  • Severe toothache pain upon chewing or application of pressure
  • Prolonged sensitivity/pain to heat or cold temperatures lasting more than 30 seconds (Nerve inflamed)
  • Discoloration (a darkening) of the tooth. No pain (Nerve died)
  • Swelling and tenderness in the nearby gums
  • A persistent or recurring pimple on the gums (abscess)

Endodontic therapy or “root canal” eliminates the infected the nerve of the tooth by cleaning a shaping the space inside of the roots occupied by the infected pulp and restoring these spaces with a plastic filler material.

A root canal requires one or more office visits and can be performed by a dentist or endodontist. An endodontist is a dentist who specializes in root canals.

The first step in the procedure is to take an X-ray to see the shape of the root canals and determine if there are any signs of infection in a surrounding bone. Your dentist or endodontist will then use local anesthesia to numb the tooth. Next, to keep the area dry and free of saliva during treatment, a rubber dam is placed (a sheet of rubber) around the tooth.

The pulp along with bacteria, the decayed nerve tissue is removed from the tooth. The cleaning out process is accomplished by using root canal files and antimicrobial agents. Once the tooth is thoroughly cleaned, it is sealed with a pink plastic filler called “gutta percha”. The final step involves further restoration of the tooth with a crown.

Root Canal

Do I need a root canal if I need a crown?

Not always. Sometimes, vital teeth can be restored with a crown without needing a root canal prior to placement of the crown. The tooth may need a root canal if it shows any of the signs mentioned before, such as, extreme sensitivity, severe toothache, swelling, etc.

Do I need a crown if I get a root canal?

Almost always. Since a tooth that needs a root canal often has a large filling or extensive decay, a crown and post, or other restoration often needs to be placed on the tooth to protect it, prevent it from breaking, and restore it to full function.

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How do Porcelain Veneers Differ from Dental Crowns?

Porcelain Veneers

Porcelain Veneers

In comparison to crowns, porcelain veneers just cover over the front side of a tooth.

Porcelain veneers are wafer thin.

As alluded above, crowns and porcelain veneers differ by way of their comparative thickness.

  • Porcelain veneers are wafer thin, typically measuring 1 millimeter in thickness or less.
  • Dental crowns usually have a thickness of 2 millimeters or more.

Less tooth grinding is required.

This means that significantly less tooth trimming is required when veneers are placed.

  • Less reduction is needed on the tooth’s front side, where the veneer is bonded.
  • No trimming is needed on the tooth’s backside.
  • With some veneering techniques no tooth reduction is needed at all.

This is a very important feature of veneers. It means that, as compared to crowns, when they are place less healthy tooth structure is sacrificed. Additionally, the preparation process is less traumatic for the tooth (and possibly the patient too).

Comparing characteristics and applications of crowns vs. veneers.

Crowns and veneers have their own individual set of characteristics that generally make one or the other more suitable for certain applications. Here are some of the factors dentists take into consideration when determining which one makes the better choice for a patient’s case.

Dental Crowns

dental crown

Dental Crowns

  • Can be used to produce a large color change for a tooth.
  • Can create significant shape changes for a tooth.
  • Are often used to rebuild and strengthen teeth that are badly broken or decayed.
  • Crowns are very strong and durable. They make a good choice in those situations where a tooth is exposed to heavy chewing or biting forces, or else forces created by tooth clenching and grinding (bruxism).
  • Placing a crown requires a significant amount of tooth reduction.
  • Once a crown has been placed on a tooth, it will always require one.

As you’ll see in the next list, as compared to crowns which can be used to rebuild and strengthen teeth, porcelain veneers are typically used in applications that are just cosmetic in nature.

Porcelain Veneers

Dental Veneers: Porcelain Veneer installation Procedure. 3D illustration

  • A case that utilizes both porcelain veneers and crowns.
  • Crowns are stronger and used to make larger shape changes.
  • Can be used to produce a color change for a tooth. Slight to moderate changes usually give the most life-like results.
  • Can create minor shape changes for a tooth.
  • Are placed on teeth whose underlying tooth structure is generally healthy and intact.
  • Are strong but brittle. Porcelain veneers typically do best in those situations where the forces placed upon them are relatively light or passive.
  • Require much less tooth trimming than dental crowns. Some veneering situations may require no tooth reduction at all.
  • In some special instances, porcelain veneer placement may be reversible. In most cases, however, once a veneer has been placed, the tooth will always require some type of covering. This might be another porcelain or other type of veneer, or else the tooth could be further reduced and a dental crown placed.

 

Instances when crowns and veneers barely differ at all.

Dental Crown

Dental Crown

There can be times when the distinction between an all-ceramic crown and (what’s referred to as a) veneer can be difficult to make at all.

What we’re referring to here is the growing trend where the treating dentist has elected to aggressively trim a tooth in preparation for its veneer. Cutting more deeply into it, and on more surfaces (sides), than outlined by the original, very conservative, protocol for this procedure.

For the most part, this type of zealous trimming is a symptom of the dentist applying veneering technique to a case for which it is not best suited. This would include using veneers to “straighten” severely misaligned teeth (“instant” orthodontics) or lightening darkly stained ones. (These types of cases are frequently plagued with longevity issues.)

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crown bridge Hobe Sound dentist

What Are Dental Crowns And Tooth Bridges?

Both crowns and most bridges are fixed prosthetic devices. Unlike removable devices such as dentures, which you can take out and clean daily, crowns and bridges are cemented onto existing teeth or implants, and can only be removed by a dentist.

How do Crowns Work?

A crown is used to entirely cover or “cap” a damaged tooth. Besides strengthening a damaged tooth, a crown can be used to improve its appearance, shape or alignment. A crown can also be placed on top of an implant to provide a tooth-like shape and structure for function. Porcelain or ceramic crowns can be matched to the color of your natural teeth. Other materials include gold and metal alloys, acrylic and ceramic. These alloys are generally stronger than porcelain and may be recommended for back teeth. Porcelain bonded to a metal shell is often used because it is both strong and attractive.

Your dentist may recommend a crown to:

  • Replace a large filling when there isn’t enough tooth remaining
  • Protect a weak tooth from fracturing
  • Restore a fractured tooth
  • Attach a bridge
  • Cover a dental implant
  • Cover a discolored or poorly shaped tooth
  • Cover a tooth that has had root canal treatment

How do Bridges Work?

A bridge may be recommended if you’re missing one or more teeth. Gaps left by missing teeth eventually cause the remaining teeth to rotate or shift into the empty spaces, resulting in a bad bite. The imbalance caused by missing teeth can also lead to gum disease and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders.

Bridges are commonly used to replace one or more missing teeth. They span the space where the teeth are missing. Bridges are cemented to the natural teeth or implants surrounding the empty space. These teeth, called abutments, serve as anchors for the bridge. A replacement tooth, called a pontic, is attached to the crowns that cover the abutments. As with crowns, you have a choice of materials for bridges. Your dentist can help you decide which to use, based on the location of the missing tooth (or teeth), its function, aesthetic considerations and cost. Porcelain or ceramic bridges can be matched to the color of your natural teeth.

crown bridge Hobe Sound dentist

How are Crowns and Bridges Made?

Before either a crown or a bridge can be made, the tooth (or teeth) must be reduced in size so that the crown or bridge will fit over it properly. After reducing the tooth/teeth, your dentist will take an impression to provide an exact mold for the crown or bridge. If porcelain is to be used, your dentist will determine the correct shade for the crown or bridge to match the color of your existing teeth.

Using this impression, a dental lab then makes your crown or bridge, in the material your dentist specifies. A temporary crown or bridge will be put in place to cover the prepared tooth while the permanent crown or bridge is being made. When the permanent crown or bridge is ready, the temporary crown or bridge is removed, and the new crown or bridge is cemented over your prepared tooth or teeth.

How Long do Crowns and Bridges Last?

While crowns and bridges can last a lifetime, they do sometimes come loose or fall out. The most important step you can take to ensure the longevity of your crown or bridge is to practice good oral hygiene. A bridge can lose its support if the teeth or bone holding it in place are damaged by dental disease. Keep your gums and teeth healthy by Brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day and flossing daily. Also see your dentist and hygienist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings.

To prevent damage to your new crown or bridge, avoid chewing hard foods, ice or other hard objects.

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dental crown procedure what is a crown cap

Dental Crown

When explaining the treatment details of each of our virtual smile makeovers, we often suggest that either dental crowns or porcelain veneers might be used to create the results that we’ve illustrated in the case’s results.
And although it is true that they can both create the same cosmetic end result, these two types of restorations are very different and therefore have different applications.

What’s the difference between a dental crown and porcelain veneer?

Crown vs. Veneer

An illustration showing the difference between a porcelain veneer and crown.
A crown encases the entire tooth, a veneer just its front side.
A fundamental difference between veneers and crowns is how much of the tooth they cover over.

  • Crowns typically encase the entire tooth.
  • Veneers only cover over a tooth’s front surface (the side that shows when the person smiles).

Details about crowns.

As another major difference (and as our graphic illustrates), crowns are much thicker than veneers. Here’s the how and why in regard to that point.

dental crown

Dental crown placement requires a significant amount of tooth trimming.

When a dentist prepares a tooth for a crown, it’s reduced in size and shape to a tapered nub.

The idea is, when the crown is cemented, it becomes the new outer surface for the tooth. (That’s why a crown can be used to give a tooth a new color as well as a new shape.)

How much trimming is needed?

The amount of tooth reduction that’s required usually lies on the order of at least 2 millimeters (2 mm is just slightly more than one sixteenth of an inch). There can, however, be reasons why a dentist may need to trim even more in some areas.

This measurement is based on the fact that most crowns need to be at least 2mm thick. That varies however depending on the type of materials that it’s made out of (porcelain, metal or a combination of both). Generally speaking, less tooth reduction is needed for all-metal crowns.
Details from dental research:

We ran across a pair of studies (Edelhoff 2002, page references) that measured how much tooth structure was removed when different types of restorations were placed.

Using that data, it’s easy enough to understand how much more aggressive the act of placing a porcelain veneer is vs. a dental crown.

Crowns – A preparation for this type of restoration typically involves trimming away 63% to 76% of the tooth’s anatomical crown (the portion of the tooth that lies above the gum line).
Veneers – Minimal-prep porcelain veneers may only require 3% anatomical crown reduction. More extensive preparations may involve up to 30%.
This data as a general comparison – Crown placement typically involves 2 to 4 times as much tooth reduction as laminates.
The above data is for porcelain veneers (which are typically just placed on anterior (front) teeth and sometimes premolars), and all-ceramic and porcelain-metal crowns (placed on either front or back teeth).

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Dental Implant Head And Bridge

What is the Difference Between Crowns, Bridges, Implants & Veneers?

One of the first steps to getting your oral health back on track is determining what treatment you may need. Learn about the differences between dental crowns, bridges, implants and veneers, and how each can help you get your beautiful smile back.
porcelain dental crown

What is a dental crown?

Purpose: Cover & restore a damaged tooth without extraction

A dental crown, also known as a “cap” is used to restore teeth without actually removing or implanting any teeth. The crown is placed over an existing damaged tooth and is cemented in place.

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Dental Implant Head And Bridge

A dentist / dental technician placing the fixed partial denture ( the dental bridge) on the implants.

What is a dental bridge?

Purpose: Replace one or more missing teeth by anchoring to existing teeth

While a crown is used to cover an existing tooth, a dental bridge is used to fill in the missing space caused by one or more lost teeth. A bridge is made up of one or more false teeth with one crown on either end of the bridge. The crowns are placed over existing teeth on either side of the gap in your smile, functioning as anchors for the bridge.

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titanium dental implants

What is a dental implant?

Purpose: Replace a tooth with a fully functional implant embedded in your jaw

Dental implants are installed securely into your jaw bone and are modern dentistry’s best answer to replacing teeth. The implant itself is fused with your bone, and a natural-looking crown makes up the visible tooth portion. Multiple implants can also be combined in a bridge.

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porcelain dental veneers

What is a dental veneer?

Purpose: Add a luminous white coating to your teeth

A dental veneer is a thin coating of white, gleaming porcelain which is used to cover the surface of a tooth. Unlike crowns, bridges and implants, veneers are primarily aesthetic, and are less commonly used for dental health problems.

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What is the difference between a crown, bridge, implant and veneer?

Here is an overview of the differences between each dental solution:

Dental Crowns

  • Restore a damaged tooth by covering it with a porcelain cap
  • For cosmetic and restorative purposes

Dental Bridge

  • Used to replace one or more missing teeth
  • Can be fitted with dental crowns or implants
  • For cosmetic and restorative purposes

Dental Implant

  • A fully functional tooth replacement that is embedded into the jaw
  • Can be installed with a bridge to replace multiple missing teeth
  • For cosmetic and restorative purposes

Dental Veneer

  • A coating used to reshape or brighten teeth that are misshapen or discolored
  • Primarily used for cosmetic purposes, but can be restorative
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